Paul Laudicina – Beating The Global Odds

In the book, the author argues that in today’s complex,confusing and constantly changing world, individuals and organizations of all kinds are faced with too much information and not enough understanding of it resulting in paralysis by analysis or on the flip side, frenetic and unfocused activity, devoid of clarity or purpose.

In the midst of these changing realties, characterized by hyperconnectivity, digitization and every growing complexity, consumers and companies alike that cling to outmoded concepts of products and services are continually left flat-footed.

On a macroscale, the decoupling of wealth creation from value creation has led to increasingly divided, alienated and atomized societies lacking a shared sense of purpose. The resulting provincial thinking has impeded diversity of ideas and inclusion of people, stifling innovation and value creation, which in turn drives wealth creation for businesses, societies and individuals.

To overcome these obstacles and beat the global odds, the author suggests a few fascinating approaches including

1) Values based leadership – We need to move from a world and a system in which people do good by doing well – that is, benefit others and the planet only as a byproduct of focusing on personal profit – to a system in which one does well by doing good – when providing true leadership and service is the central priority and financial returns and personal enrichment are merely their corollaries.

2) Keep it simple – Excessive abundance of choices and options in every aspect of life causes anxiety, stress and diminishes our sense of well-being. Instead, focus on simplicity – in products, lifestyles and in operations. The key is to not avoid modernity, but to identify and eliminate unnecessary complexity.

“We need to move from a world and a system in which people do good by doing well – that is, benefit others and the planet only as a byproduct of focusing on personal profit – to a system in which one does well by doing good – when providing true leadership and service is the central priority and financial returns and personal enrichment are merely their corollaries.”

3) Repair social fabric – Personal bonds of trust between employee/employer, consumer/manufacturer, borrower/lender are broken and need to be reforged as they are the glue to good business. To rebuild this sense of community and common purpose within a for-profit company, people need to spend time together.

4) Don’t wait for the next big thing – Though conventional wisdom suggests to start with market research, companies need to avoid being reactive and get on with innovating – seizing smaller opportunities instead of waiting for the next big boom.

5) Open the aperture – Expose yourself to different interests and points of view. Become an information omnivore,and ideally a discerning omnivore.

6) Turn pixels into clearer picture – Engage in scenario planning. It will not only expand an individual and an organization’s field of vision but also helps them powerfully imagine the future.

This book is a fascinating read with exciting new ideas and highly recommended. You can get more information about the book and/or the author here.